Free Footwear Health Check
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The freedom of barefoot walking but ……

The warmer months and autumn days are a great time to enjoy being outdoors more often, maybe visiting a beach, going bush or just hanging out at home or with friends.

Many people just love to go barefoot as often as possible indoors and outdoors. The risk of going barefoot is getting cuts, nicks and even stung on your feet. The feel of textures like sand between our toes, grass under our feet, the dirt of the campsite, the river pebbles and for some the heat of the paths and roads, can be just so freeing! Yet it is ill advised for people especially with some health conditions. For people with diabetes a small cut can take longer to heal and there is more risk of it becoming infected. If the person with diabetes has neuropathy – reduced sensation and feeling in their feet – they may not be aware of a cut until it becomes infected.

Going barefoot can also be a problem for people with cardiovascular conditions when there is reduced blood flow and circulation to the feet. Anywhere on the body that has reduced blood flow can take longer to heel.

When it hurts to walk because we have a cut or sore on our feet we are less likely to be as active. This can lead to further health problems like weight gain and loss of muscle tone and stamina. At Happy Feet Pedorthics clients talk about “before” referring to their active life style when they were fit and trim, before the damage to their feet.

Have you ever noticed how tired and sore feet have become when on your feet all day, bare foot, doing the daily clean, or spring cleaning, the washing, the cooking, the gardening and more! The difference between sore feet and not is to wear supportive footwear. At Happy Feet Pedorthics some clients keep the shoes for going out and it is back to bare feet, socks and if your feet are lucky slippers being worn all day in the house! No good at all for one’s feet – slips, trips and falls, stubbing your toes, lack of support for the muscles, tendons and bones in your feet!

Our advice at Happy Feet Pedorthics is:

  • Not to risk going barefoot either in or outside the house.
  • Wear some form of footwear at all times – minimal protection such as thongs or the original crocs.
  • Sit and feel the sand, grass and pebbles.
  • Check your feet regularly, keeping them clean, maintained by attending to callous and nail cutting.
  • Ask your podiatrist about how regularly you should attend for ideal foot care, and at the same time ask about self-care between visits. For some people regular podiatry visits are a must!

Clare Nelson CPed CM AU Feb 16 2016

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